Category Archives: Panel: Reconsidering Network/History

microfilm

Transfiguring the Newspaper: From Paper to Microfilm to Database

Presentation by Sandra Gabriele (Concordia University). The rise of databases containing collections of historical newspapers has been heralded as an efficient and potentially revolutionary way of accessing our cultural heritage. Networked databases facilitate the creation of large datasets and comparative

microfilm

Transfiguring the Newspaper: From Paper to Microfilm to Database

Presentation by Sandra Gabriele (Concordia University). The rise of databases containing collections of historical newspapers has been heralded as an efficient and potentially revolutionary way of accessing our cultural heritage. Networked databases facilitate the creation of large datasets and comparative

Warburg

Aby Warburg and the Networks of Art History

Presentation by Pepper Stetler (Miami University). This paper will explore what art historical methods of analysis can provide for the burgeoning fields of network theory and network archaeology.  While art history might seem to be the discipline best equipped to

Warburg

Aby Warburg and the Networks of Art History

Presentation by Pepper Stetler (Miami University). This paper will explore what art historical methods of analysis can provide for the burgeoning fields of network theory and network archaeology.  While art history might seem to be the discipline best equipped to

Stack

Last In, First Out: Media Archaeology of/as the Stack

Presentation by Rory Solomon (The New School). Essential to any analysis of networked media is an understanding of the “stack.” This oft cited diagrammatic illustrates how protocol is operationalized within networked systems. Protocol, as Alex Galloway has written, is the

Stack

Last In, First Out: Media Archaeology of/as the Stack

Presentation by Rory Solomon (The New School). Essential to any analysis of networked media is an understanding of the “stack.” This oft cited diagrammatic illustrates how protocol is operationalized within networked systems. Protocol, as Alex Galloway has written, is the